 ian begley

The PS4 Pro is here at last and Playstation 4 games have never looked so good.
The console offers a significant improvement over the existing PS4 title and features 4K output alongside HDR playback capabilities and upgraded internals components that will help games run smoother with even more details.
Developers are now able to start creating games with two modes – PS4 base mode, and “Pro Mode” – that is more taxing and power-consuming than the original system can handle.
After experiencing what the new console is capable of – highly detailed 4K/HDR gameplay, Ultra-HD media streaming from apps like Netflix and the new Pro Mode – I compared it to the now out of date PS4 system I have at home
The most obvious difference between the original PS4 and the PS4 Pro is the addition of an extra layer onto the console.
While the original PS4 had two layers separated by a gap for the disc drive and two USB ports, the PS4 Pro has three layers.
This is the big one – the main reason it’s worth making the jump from the original hardware to the PS4 Pro.
The PS4 Pro supports 4K output, as opposed to the standard PS4’s Full HD 1080p resolution.
When it comes to streaming services such as Netflix this means that the console will be able to play movies and TV shows in their maximum resolution, but unfortunately the lack of an Ultra HD Blu-ray drive means that the console will not be able to play physical 4K media.
Games are slightly more complicated because it will be up to developers to decide how they want to use the PS4 Pro’s extra muscle.
The PS4 Pro is undoubtedly a substantial step up from the PS4, but ‘true’ 4K gaming is difficult for it to achieve without compromise.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here