The statue of Phil Lynott, recently returned to its place in Harry Street, just off Grafton Street, recently after undergoing repair works

Phil Lynott would have, and should have, been 64 this week, and 27 years after his death, fans are still very much in love with him.

The Thin Lizzy legend has been back in the papers in the past week after his statue was restored to its former glory on Dublin’s Harry Street.

Fans were up in arms when the life-size effigy (and let’s not forget Phil was over six feet tall) was knocked over and cracked in May.

The culprits owned up and apologised, while an anonymous donor footed the €3,500 bill for repairs.

The bronze figure was back in business outside Bruxelle’s last Thursday morning, with a firmer base to help prevent any further accidents.

Hordes of people crammed into Harry Street to celebrate the restoration of what’s become one of Dublin’s landmarks since it was erected in 2005.

Phil’s biggest fan is, no doubt, his mother, Philomena, who unveiled the statue, but not before she thanked onlookers for keeping Phil’s music and memory alive.

Immaculately dressed with impeccable hair, this remarkable woman is ever-beaming with pride for her late son, but didn’t let the tribute go by without reminding the crowd why it’s Phil’s statue we’re now hailing, and, sadly, not Phil himself.

Philomena said she hoped parents would “teach their children about the dangers of drugs…[that] are taking our young children and filling our cemeteries. Try to get through to your children and you’ll have a better life,” she advised.

Proof that Phil Lynott’s mum can be just as powerful behind a microphone as her son was all those years ago.

 Dee Woods presents Nova Nights on Radio Nova Mon-Fri 7pm-12am & Sundays 12-2pm. Follow her on Twitter @radeeoh