Jordan Larmour in action for the Irish Under-20s earlier in 2017. Picture: Deryck Vincent

JORDAN Larmour should be parachuted straight into the Ireland squad for the upcoming Six Nations tournament according to former Leinster out-half Andy Dunne.
The rising star is the name on the lips of every Irish rugby fan at the moment after his sensational solo try against Munster in the Pro14 on St Stephen’s Day.
Many former and current stars of the game have since come out in praise of the 20-year-old former St Andrew’s College full-back and wing, and Dunne told offtheball.com that Ireland manager Joe Schmidt should now sit up and take serious notice of the youngster.
“I certainly would be of the school of thought that you throw him straight in because he’s good enough. He can do things most guys can’t do,” said Dunne.
“You have to go back 20 years at the highest level and not find someone who can do that in a Leinster-Munster game.”
Leinster held an eight-point lead as the game reached the 69th minute but all was still to play for. Munster out-half Ian Keatley delivered an up-an-under towards the 22 metre line as he looked to get his side back into the game.
However, his kick was picked up by Larmour who masterfully side-stepped two challenges. He then accelerated away from the chasing pack before side-stepping Keatley. Munster fullback Simon Zebo provided one last attempt to stop Larmour but he impressively switched the ball from his right to left hand and managed to touch down.
Larmour is still a raw talent who has a lot to learn, particularly defensively but Dunne believes he has such ability that he should be allowed to learn on the job.
“He can learn defensively how to improve quickly under pressure and I think you’ve got to allow him to make a mistake or two at the highest level and keep him there.
“I wouldn’t say he deserves to, without doubt, go in there and start but he needs a couple of international games to grow his confidence. I think the worst thing we could possibly do with a guy like that is start chipping away at him. It would be a very Irish thing to sit on him and say no.
“I think it would be a shame because a player like that could lose confidence quickly. He needs to be wrapped up and managed. For me, the best way to do that is to let him go out and make a few mistakes.”