Liffey Street, where the alleged assault took place. Picture: Google Maps

A man who was jailed for biting an American tourist acting as “a good Samaritan”, told gardaí he could not have caused the injuries to the victim because he has no teeth.

Aaron Kiely (35) of no fixed abode pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to assaulting Sean Beauchamp causing him harm at Liffey Street, Dublin 1 on August 13, 2017. He has 185 previous convictions for assault, violent behaviour, robbery, theft and road traffic offences.

Kiely was jailed for 18 months after the court heard the victim had injuries to his head, ear, face and arm after a number of people set upon when he intervened in a row between Kiely and his girlfriend.

Judge Martin Nolan commented that it was “not a particularly good day for good Samaritans”.

He said the victim took steps to make sure he had not become infected from the bite which caused him “considerable additional worry”.

Judge Nolan accepted that Kiely was intoxicated that day before he sentenced him to 18 months in prison.

Detective Garda Patrick Gallagher told John Byrne BL, prosecuting, that Mr Beauchamp was working for an airline and had come in on a flight into Dublin that day. He was in the city centre looking for somewhere to eat when he spotted Kiely and a woman nearby.

He said the couple seemed to be intoxicated before Kiely appeared to grab her by the throat and blows were exchanged between the pair.

Mr Beuachamp intervened, wrestling Kiely to the ground and the woman walked away.

Det Gda Gallagher said a number of people then stepped in to come to Kiely’s aid and Mr Beauchamp was assaulted. During the attack Kiely bit him on the ear and swung a crutch at him.

The victim was later treated in hospital for injuries to his head, face, ear and arm. Kiely was identified as a suspect as gardaí viewed CCTV footage of the attack.

Kiely told gardaí he and his partner were having “a domestic” and he believed Mr Beauchamp started the fight. He said he could not have been able to bite the victim as he has no teeth.

Det Gda Gallagher said Mr Beauchamp had a number of blood tests carried out in Ireland to ensure he had not been infected from the bite.

When he returned to American he got further tests carried out as he was anxious about the potential consequences of the assault. All tests proved negative.

A victim impact report stated that Mr Beauchamp paid €15,000 in medical costs, €11,000 of which was covered by his insurance. He needed stitches to his ear but had since made a full recovery.

Oisin Clarke BL, defending, said his client was now stable on methadone and asked the court to accept that his plea of guilty prevented the victim from having to travel to Ireland to give evidence at trial.

“He is not a man of violence,” counsel asked the court to accept before he added that the other people who were involved in the attack were not there at “his client’s behest”.