By Cian Valentine

A Chapelizod-based charity is calling on big-hearted Dubs to help transform the lives of African children, with their unwanted tech helping to create a better digital future in West Africa.

Founded by Cormac Lynch in 2005, Camara Education aims to educate children in Africa to help them out of poverty and to help provide different education models in Third World countries.

Camara – which comes from the Bantu dialect of West Africa and means “teacher”, or “one who teaches with experience” – wants technology-boosted education made available to children from disadvantaged countries to help empower them in learning.

With six education hubs set up around West Africa, including in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, and Lesotho, Camara’s always on the look-out for old computers to refurbish and reuse, making a huge difference to schools in Africa.

Camara supporter Mark Fox, who works with refurbishing the computers to ship, said: “Each refurbished computer installed in an Ethiopian school positively impacts the education of 33 students.

“It inspires students to unlock their potential. There is no shortage of young people from disadvantaged communities who need access to computers to improve their education.”

Thanks to their work down the years, Camara have supported more than one million children with their initiative through technology, delivering thousands of computers to children in disadvantaged communities.

Due to their work, Camara has gained a multitude of awards such as the Vodafone World Difference award; Pan African Awards in 2016 for entrepreneurship in education, and many more.

Camara Education chief executive Jean Cox-Kearns told Dublin Gazette: “Our goal everywhere we work is to have impact in education.

“Education is important in Africa to help move people out of poverty, to help develop critical thinking skills that will help them compete on the global job market.”

If you’re upgrading your computer, or have an older computer that could help, contact computers@camara.org for further information on how your computer could help support dozens of delighted students in Africa.

Camara are also always looking for volunteers to help with workshops. For further information, see www.camara.org.