Ringsend locals are said they are outraged and saddened over the suspected killing of a number of swans in the area.

A resident reported an adult swan laying dead and covered in what appeared to be bloody footprints on its body on the footpath of the Iron Bridge, also known as Boland’s Bridge, in the area on Saturday morning.

Many lamented the death of the bird, saying that the swans by the dock – and in other areas of the southside town – are one of the key focal points of the locality, and attract a number of visitors.

In a local Facebook group, some suspected that the high winds over the weekend may have led to the swan being blown into a nearby building or bus, leading to its death.

Several other locals then took to Facebook to claim that they have seen the remains of two other swans that were seemingly killed maliciously at the Grand Canal Locks in the week prior, as well as a dead swan potentially covered in blood in a bag near the Treasury in the area.

LynLyn Ok said: “I hope if a person harmed the defenceless animals they are caught. If they can do this, what else are they capable of?”

Caroline Hm said: “That’s so sad one of the lads in work feeds the swans every morning. I can’t believe someone would hurt them, [there are] sick people out there.”

Grainne Hughes said that she also spotted the deceased swan, and that she was shocked to see the animal in such a state.

“I rang An Garda Siochana and the DSPCA (couldn’t get through [to the DSPCA]. This was shocking to see [on Saturday morning]. The guards were not one bit interested… and I was told to ring the council.

“It was shocking sight to see, I thought it was a duvet or something at first, my stomach dropped when I realized what it was.

“I had to do something [about the dead swan]. I was fighting back the tears – it was heartbreaking,” Hughes wrote in a local Facebook group.

Horrified residents have said they have contacted a number of animal cruelty organisations to come out to inspect the deceased swans, and have called for the review of CCTV footage in the locality to see if the swans had been brutally killed.

Under the Wild Birds Protection Act of 1930, it is illegal to knowingly and wilfully to shoot or attempt to shoot any wild bird – including swans – between March 1st and July 31st.