CROSS Avenue in Dun Laoghaire – a spot notorious for ‘rat-running’ drivers – is set to get a €30,000 investment to tackle traffic issues.

The grant is part of a pilot traffic-calming scheme and the council will have to record speeds both before and after implementations of varied traffic-calming initiatives and prepare a report on the effectiveness of the measures.

Cross Avenue is receiving €30,000 from the Department of Transport to undertake further traffic counts, a license plate survey to establish if rat-running is still occurring, a safety audit, some possible scheme adjustments and an overall report.

Speaking on the investment, Minister for Transport Shane Ross said that the consequences of speeding in built-up areas like Dun Laoghaire can be fatal.

He said: “This initiative will examine appropriate ways of providing effective traffic-calming measures which do not overly rely on the use of ramps.

“In many cases, the measures will be associated with new lower speed limits. A new speed limit option of 20kmph was introduced recently following the Jake’s Legacy campaign, which was set up after the tragic death of six-year-old Jake Brennan, who was killed in a road traffic incident in the housing estate where he lived.”

The pilot project in Dun Laoghaire also involves implementing measures in seven housing estates in conjunction with the residents of those estates.

Avoca Avenue cell, Marley Grange estate, Balally estate, Beech Park/Clonkeen Drive cell, Ballyogan Avenue, Watsons estate and Hainault Road are the proposed estates to receive certain new measures, including speed alert signs.

At present, all of the estates selected have a 50 kmph speed limit – the speed alert signs will be programmed to feed back the vehicle speeds to drivers where they exceed 30 kmph.

Minister Ross added: “This measure is part of a swathe of initiatives which I am introducing as part of my campaign to increase road safety and in doing so, save lives.”