Any loophole in the law which denies co-living tenants their rights must be closed immediately, according to a Dublin TD.

Fianna Fail Housing spokesman Darragh O’Brien said he was “extremely concerned” at the approach taken by developers to shared living schemes in the capital.

Bartra Capital is arguing that the Residential Tenancies Act won’t apply to them – because kitchens and living spaces will be shared – and has reportedly written to Dublin City Council planners citing legal advice on the matter.

Deputy O’Brien said: “I would be extremely concerned about the approach that’s been taken that effectively says anyone who is living in a co-living arrangement has no recourse to a Residential Tenancies Board.

“I’m going to challenge that, and I’m calling on the Government to seek their own legal advice on it, and if needs be, Fianna Fail will bring forward amendments to the existing residency and protection legislation.”

Meanwhile, Labour Cllr for the south east inner city, Kevin Donoghue, has submitted a motion to Dublin City Council opposing co-living units being delivered under the minimum 12sq m established in the Fine Gael guidelines.

Cllr Donoghue said: “The idea of co-living in Ireland is barely in its infancy, and we are already seeing developers trying to bring units to market well below the minimum standard [of individual space required].

“This is what happens when you allow developers to be at the centre of tackling the housing crisis.

“We have to call out these developer-led efforts to undermine our planning system even further.

“The motion calls on the Planning Department in Dublin City Council to abide by the minimum standards set down by the Minister and refuse any application under 12sqm.

“An oversupply of co-living units is detrimental to the development of sustainable communities.

“What Dublin City needs is a supply of apartments and housing, at suitable densities and sizes to support a range of family sizes.”