This week, Jess Demicoli – a trainer at Icon Health Club, Camden Street – says routines are great – but sometimes it’s worth shaking things up and trying something new.

From marathons to tough mudders, pilates to aerial yoga, there is just so many fitness choices available these days to choose from. But if you are looking at getting started the good news is that the trainers at Iconic Health Clubs advise keeping it simple.

They have put together a list of exercises that even the oldest and most out of shape of us can (and should) add to our workout repertoires.

WALKING

Nothing quite beats a brisk walk. It is suitable for all ages and abilities.

Walking is a great exercise and helps to improve your heart health. Walking is the best exercise for sedentary individuals, especially adults, to reduce the risk of heart and cardiovascular disease and to help you lose weight. Many of our members use the treadmill to walk indoors (it’s not just for running) but if you’re not a member of gym, we recommend that you try and get as many steps into your day.

RUNNING

If you want to take it up a notch, try breaking into a jog. Running in particular has health benefits that extend well beyond any pill a doctor could prescribe. Studies have shown that running can help prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, some cancers, and a host of other unpleasant conditions. What’s more, scientists have shown that running also vastly improves the quality of your emotional and mental life.

It even helps you live longer. If you are taking up running for the first time, a trainer can put together a programme for you to help build up your fitness. Remember it’s not all about distance, when it comes to running.

SQUATS

If you can do nothing else, try squats. They are a great exercise to help you stay fit as you get older. Babies can naturally squat but as we get older squats become more challenging and if this is the case, then you definitely need to start building up your squat
strength again. This one exercise really is a great for the whole body as it recruits your quadriceps, glutes, hamstrings, calves, abdominals and back muscles.

Stand with your feet hip-width apart with your toes pointed slightly outward. Let your arms hang loosely by your side. Engage your core muscles and push out your chest slightly by pulling your shoulder blades towards each other. Next bend your knees and squat down as if you were sitting into a chair. Keep your weight on your heels and keep your core tight.

PUSH-UPS

Like squats, push-ups are another true whole body exercise. The pushup is often viewed as just for toning your arms but it also targets your upper body, core and your legs. If you starting off use your knees or push-off against a wall while standing. When down on the ground, set your
hands at a distance that is slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and imagine pushing the floor away from you.

SWIMMING

Swimming is a great cardiovascular workout, but the water also provides for resistance training to strengthen the muscles, whilst also protecting the joints.