EVER wondered what you look like under your skin? Well the Real Bodies exhibition which has just arrived in Dublin shows us just that.

“Human anatomy exhibits have been around for a long time, and they’ve always been really clinical but we wanted to create something that looked at how we experience our bodies before, during and after life.”

Creative Director of the exhibition, John Zaller gave The Gazette a tour of Real Bodies which is running in the Ambassador Theatre for a limited time.

This powerful, though not for the squeamish, exhibition explores life by displaying 14 real, perfectly preserved human bodies and more than 200 anatomical specimens.

Real Bodies aims to connect audiences to a deeper sense of what it means to be alive.

Founded on anatomical, cultural, and emotional narratives, the exhibition turns the way we view the human body on its head and takes visitors on a journey through the bodies functions and structures.

“This exhibition looks at the human body from a cultural and emotional perspective as well as a physiological perspective,” John explains.

 

The exhibition moves through the human body using a system by system approach, displaying 150 individual human organs. Some are healthy examples and some show signs of disease.

There are little factoids throughout the exhibition along with art installations and famous quotes on what it means to be human on the walls.

The creators skilfully integrated the old theatre into the exhibition, even incorporating the underground tunnels in parts.

These kinds of human anatomy exhibitions have been subject to controversy in recent years as ethical questions surrounding the origin of the bodies have been questioned.

 

 

According to Dr Hong Jin Sui, Professor of Anatomy at the Dalian Medical University, the bodies at this exhibition are “unclaimed bodies” from China and have been donated to medical and physiology departments in universities from city morgues.

They are all legally donated and certified to have died of natural causes.

Once in the lab, the “specimens”, or bodies are fixed in formaldehyde and maintained in refrigeration units. Our goal was to create a holistic experience of what it means to be human and to share that with Dublin,” John added.

Real Bodies is open daily to the public from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. for a limited engagement.

 

 

Tickets are available to purchase at the Ambassador Theatre box office and Ticketmaster outlets nationwide, but we have four Family Passes (admitting two adults and two children) worth €56 each. Just Like and Share the Real Bodies post on our Facebook Page – and make sure you’ve Liked the Dublin Gazette Facebook page as well!

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